Helpful News Feeds from the CDC


Emergency Response News


06/30/2016 07:00 PM
Public Health Matters Blog - Safeguarding Deadly Pathogens and Poisons
Bioterrorism is not a new threat. One of the earliest recorded uses of biological weapons dates back to the 6th century B.C., when Persian armies poisoned wells with a fungus (http://www.selectagents.gov/history.html). Modern threats, however, are more complex and could cause widespread devastation. The anthrax attacks of 2001 focused our nation on making sure especially dangerous pathogens and poisons (which we call select agents and toxins) are being handled safely and are protected at all times.
06/27/2016 03:00 PM
Public Health Matters Blog - Mosquito Control Awareness Week: Say Goodbye to Mosquitoes at Home
This week is Mosquito Control Awareness Week! Now that it?s mosquito season, it is the perfect time to look in and around your home for ways to control mosquitoes that can carry viruses like Zika and West Nile. There are many options when it comes to mosquito control for your home. No single activity will effectively control mosquitoes, so you should combine both indoor and outdoor mosquito control activities to keep in and around your home free of mosquitoes.
06/22/2016 03:00 PM
Public Health Matters Blog - Danger in the Water: When Algae Become Toxic
Ever wondered what?s causing the water in your favorite lake to turn red? Or were the family photos from your river rafting trip spoiled by brown water in the background? You may be looking at an algal bloom. Summer is upon us and warm weather is the perfect environment for these algal blooms, which can cause a range of problems, from simply being an eyesore to becoming a harmful algal bloom (HAB) that can make people and animals sick or damage local environments.
06/21/2016 03:40 PM
NEW: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 392 - CDC Recommendations for Subsequent Zika IgM Antibody Testing
Testing for Zika virus infection using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) molecular assays is now commercially available. When requesting Zika rRT-PCR testing from a commercial laboratory, providers should be aware that commercial laboratories performing rRT-PCR currently do not also offer Zika IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or confirmatory serologic testing (plaque reduction neutralization test, or PRNT). Therefore, if possible, providers should store a serum aliquot for subsequent Zika IgM ELISA testing if the rRT-PCR assay is negative. Otherwise, collection of an additional serum sample may be necessary.
06/17/2016 05:30 PM
NEW: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 391 - Best Practices for Using PCR to Diagnose Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis and Identify Serotype or Serogroup
Determining serotype for Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and serogroup for Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is crucial for identifying potential outbreaks and determining appropriate public health responses. Several new commercial multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays capable of simultaneously testing a single specimen for an array of pathogens that cause blood infections, meningitis, or encephalitis are available. These assays can rapidly identify Hi and Nm species, but most do not determine serotype or serogroup. Laboratories should continue to perform culture and use validated, specific real-time PCR assays capable of detecting and differentiating all six serotypes (a-f) of Hi and six serogroups (A, B, C, W, X, and Y) of Nm; otherwise, additional steps need to be taken including performing a reflex culture or at a minimum retaining a clinical sample for further testing.

Environmental Hazard News


05/01/2009 09:00 AM
Uranium (U) Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Everyone is exposed to uranium in food, air, and water as part of the natural environment.
  • Most exposures do not warrant monitoring or treatment.
  • Populations most heavily exposed to uranium are those employed in mining and milling operations, or in uranium enrichment and processing activities.
  • Natural and depleted uranium are primarily chemical toxicants, with radiation playing a minor role or no role at all.
  • Outcomes that may occur with uranium overexposure, based on both observed human effects and animal studies, include non-malignant respiratory disease (fibrosis, emphysema) and nephrotoxicity.
  • Nephrotoxicity should reverse as overexposure ceases.
  • Alpha radiation (such as that from uranium) is classified as a human carcinogen. However, human studies have not found elevated rates of cancer from uranium exposure, and hi...
12/18/2008 09:00 AM
Chromium Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • The toxicity of chromium compounds depends on the oxidation state of the metal.
  • Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds has been associated with increased incidence of lung cancer.
  • Chromium(III) is an essential nutrient that can be toxic in large doses.

05/23/2008 09:00 AM
Beryllium Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Beryllium produces health effects ranging from sensitization without evidence of disease to clinically apparent pulmonary disease.
  • Chronic beryllium disease may be misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis.
  • Immunologic tests can detect beryllium sensitization and help clinicians differentiate between chronic beryllium disease and other interstitial lung diseases.

05/23/2008 09:00 AM
Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Tetrachloroethylene is used mainly as a solvent for dry cleaning and metal degreasing.
  • Like most chlorinated solvents, tetrachloroethylene can cause central nervous system depression.
  • Chronic exposure to tetrachloroethylene may adversely affect the neurological system, liver, and kidneys.
  • Tetrachloroethylene is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen on the basis of limited evidence from studies in humans and sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in experimental animals.

05/12/2008 09:00 AM
Taking an Exposure History | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Because many environmental diseases either manifest as common medical problems or have nonspecific symptoms, an exposure history is vital for correct diagnosis.
  • By taking a thorough exposure history, the primary care clinician can play an important role in detecting, treating, and preventing disease due to toxic exposure.

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