Helpful News Feeds from the CDC


Emergency Response News


02/10/2016 08:00 PM
New: Public Health Matters Blog - Preparedness Love for Valentine?s Day
Whether it?s your sweetheart, your children, or your favorite furry friend, Valentine?s Day is a great time to show that someone special that you care! This Valentine?s Day, remind your loved ones to be ready for emergencies. Nothing says I love you quite like ?I have made you my emergency contact person.? Visit our latest Public Health Matters post to get great gift ideas.
02/01/2016 01:50 PM
NEW: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 387 - Flu Season Begins: Severe Influenza Illness Reported - CDC urges rapid antiviral treatment of very ill and high risk suspect influenza patients without waiting for testing
Influenza activity is increasing across the country and CDC has received reports of severe influenza illness. Clinicians are reminded to treat suspected influenza in high-risk outpatients, those with progressive disease, and all hospitalized patients with antiviral medications as soon as possible, regardless of negative rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) results and without waiting for RT-PCR testing results. Early antiviral treatment works best, but treatment may offer benefit when started up to 4-5 days after symptom onset in hospitalized patients. Early antiviral treatment can reduce influenza morbidity and mortality
01/27/2016 03:30 PM
NEW: Health Alert Network (HAN) No. 386 - CDC Urging Dialysis Providers and Facilities to Assess and Improve Infection Control Practices to Stop Hepatitis C Virus Transmission in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has received an increased number of reports of newly acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among patients undergoing hemodialysis. Infection control lapses in dialysis care could expose patients to HCV.
01/25/2016 09:00 PM
Upcoming COCA Call: Zika Virus ? What Clinicians Need to Know
Zika virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and an estimated 80% of persons infected with Zika virus are asymptomatic. Symptomatic disease is generally mild, with symptoms of fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, or nonpurulent conjunctivitis that typically last from several days to one week. Sporadic cases and outbreaks of Zika virus disease have occurred in countries in Africa and Southeast Asia. In 2015, the first local Zika virus transmission in the Americas was reported in Brazil and local transmission has now been in several countries or territories in the Americas. In the current outbreak in Brazil, a marked increase in the number of infants born with microcephaly has been reported and Zika virus infections have been confirmed in some infants with microcephaly. However, it is not known how many of the microcephaly cases are associated with Zika virus infection. Travelers to areas with ongoing outbreaks are at risk of becoming infected and spreading the virus to new areas, including the continental United States. During this COCA Call, participants will learn about the epidemiology and clinical manifestation of Zika virus disease and how early recognition and reporting of suspected cases can mitigate the risk of local transmission.
01/21/2016 05:00 PM
New: Public Health Matters Blog - 5 Things You Might Not Know About Human Papillomavirus
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus that infects both women and men. Although most HPV infections go away on their own, infections that don?t go away (persist) can cause changes in the cells and lead to cancer. With HPV vaccine, we have a powerful tool to prevent most of these cancers from ever developing. While cervical cancer is the most common and well-known HPV cancer, it?s not the only type of cancer HPV infections can cause. In honor of Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, here are five things you might not know about HPV.

Environmental Hazard News


05/01/2009 10:00 AM
Uranium (U) Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Everyone is exposed to uranium in food, air, and water as part of the natural environment.
  • Most exposures do not warrant monitoring or treatment.
  • Populations most heavily exposed to uranium are those employed in mining and milling operations, or in uranium enrichment and processing activities.
  • Natural and depleted uranium are primarily chemical toxicants, with radiation playing a minor role or no role at all.
  • Outcomes that may occur with uranium overexposure, based on both observed human effects and animal studies, include non-malignant respiratory disease (fibrosis, emphysema) and nephrotoxicity.
  • Nephrotoxicity should reverse as overexposure ceases.
  • Alpha radiation (such as that from uranium) is classified as a human carcinogen. However, human studies have not found elevated rates of cancer from uranium exposure, and hi...
12/18/2008 10:00 AM
Chromium Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • The toxicity of chromium compounds depends on the oxidation state of the metal.
  • Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds has been associated with increased incidence of lung cancer.
  • Chromium(III) is an essential nutrient that can be toxic in large doses.

05/23/2008 10:00 AM
Beryllium Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Beryllium produces health effects ranging from sensitization without evidence of disease to clinically apparent pulmonary disease.
  • Chronic beryllium disease may be misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis.
  • Immunologic tests can detect beryllium sensitization and help clinicians differentiate between chronic beryllium disease and other interstitial lung diseases.

05/23/2008 10:00 AM
Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) Toxicity | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Tetrachloroethylene is used mainly as a solvent for dry cleaning and metal degreasing.
  • Like most chlorinated solvents, tetrachloroethylene can cause central nervous system depression.
  • Chronic exposure to tetrachloroethylene may adversely affect the neurological system, liver, and kidneys.
  • Tetrachloroethylene is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen on the basis of limited evidence from studies in humans and sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in experimental animals.

05/12/2008 10:00 AM
Taking an Exposure History | ATSDR - Environmental Medicine & Environmental Health Education - CSEM
  • Because many environmental diseases either manifest as common medical problems or have nonspecific symptoms, an exposure history is vital for correct diagnosis.
  • By taking a thorough exposure history, the primary care clinician can play an important role in detecting, treating, and preventing disease due to toxic exposure.

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